Effective, safe, and as fast as reasonably possible

For readers who are interested in the processes and the speed with which potential new cancer drugs can be brought to market here in the USA (and other places around the world too), there in an important article in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine. … READ MORE …

“Our study confirmed our suspicion” that “these pills were junk.”

According to what appears to have been a pretty forthright presentation at the ongoing annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), many commonly used men’s health and prostate supplements weren’t helping prostate cancer patients. … READ MORE …

Assessing the “value” of treatment with specific drugs (here in the USA)

Last Friday, the National Comprehensive Cancer Cancer Network (NCCN) introduced a new way for doctors and patients to be able to consider the clinical “value” of treatment with specific drugs in specific forms of cancer. How useful this method is will take a while to work out. … READ MORE …

The multi-factorial nature of SBRT safety

In a previous article, we looked at the experimental use of extreme hypofractionated radiation therapy (SBRT or SABR) to treat high-risk patients. Here, we take a closer look at an early (Phase I/II) safety study by Bauman et al. that shows why radiation safety is more complicated than just setting the treatment dose. … READ MORE …

Disulfiram in prostate cancer revisited (this time with copper supplementation)

Not so long ago (back in late 2013), Schweizer et al. reported data from a very small trial of an old drug called disulfiram (also known as Antabuse) in the treatment of men with progressive prostate cancer after first-line therapy. … READ MORE …

Data from the long-term follow-up of a Phase II trial of tasquinimod in mCRPC

More than 3 years ago now, we reported that Pili et al. presented data from a Phase II trial of tasquinimod showing progression-free and overall survival benefits compared to a placebo in the management of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In February 2011 we reported an update to these data by Armstrong et al. … READ MORE …

Avanafil in treatment of post-surgical ED for men with localized prostate cancer

Data published on line in the Journal of Urology last December suggest that the new PDE5 inhibitor known as avanafil or Stendra® is supposedly effective in combating erectile dysfunction (ED) in just over one-third of men with ED at 6 months after bilateral, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

Is salvage cryotherapy really as safe and effective as some suggest?

There have been an increasing number of articles published in the recent past suggesting salvage cryotherapy as an excellent option for the treatment of men with progressive prostate cancer after failure of first-line radiation therapy. … READ MORE …

First directly comparative data question safety of PBRT vs. IMRT

For the first time, some 15 years after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) was initially popularized as a potential treatment for prostate cancer by the group at Loma Linda, we have an independent assessment of the risk for side effects associated with this form of radiation therapy … and the comparative data are not good. … READ MORE …

Side effect profile of MDV3100 appears highly promising in mCRPC

According to a number of media reports today, Medivation’s investigational drug MDV3100 appears to have a relatively good safety profile, although five patients who received MDV3100 in the completed Phase III trial did have seizures. … READ MORE …

ASTRO claims “Proton therapy effective prostate cancer treatment”

A media release issued yesterday by ASTRO reads as follows: … READ MORE …

AUA comments on FDA guidance on safe use of 5-ARIs

The American Urological Association (AUA) has written to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) seeking modification of the FDA’s recent guidance on the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors like dutasteride and finasteride in the management of urologic conditions. … READ MORE …

Vitamin D, cancer prevention, research data, and media releases

There is an interesting article just published in Anticancer Research that comes to the conclusion that, “Universal intake of up to 40,000 IU vitamin D per day is unlikely to result in vitamin D toxicity.” However, one needs to interpret the content of this article — and this conclusion — with some care. … READ MORE …