Less treatment regret with SBRT, and when patients are fully informed

There is growing recognition that the patient’s satisfaction or regret with his treatment decision is more than just a matter of whether he is happy with the oncological outcome. Satisfaction/regret is the product of many variables, including how well he understood his options, his interactions with his doctors, the side effects he suffered and when he suffered them, his expectations about the side effects of treatment, and cultural factors. … READ MORE …

Does your doctor ever thank you for coming to see him or her?

So there was a fascinating article in last October’s issue of Medical Economics that has just been brought to our attention. … READ MORE …

Satisfaction with “information provision” among Dutch prostate cancer patients

Sometimes — your sitemaster is willing to admit — he can become distinctly aggravated by the quality and conclusions of certain types of research related to the management of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Music (plus lidocaine) soothes the savaged male

A small, randomized, pilot study has shown that music (along with some lidocaine) reduces the anxiety, pain, and dissatisfaction of men having a TRUS-guided biopsy compared to the lidocaine alone. … READ MORE …

Quality of life after standard therapies for localized prostate cancer

Assessment of patient quality of life (QoL) after standard forms of treatment for localized prostate cancer is difficult for many reasons — not least because there is no real agreement among members of the research community about the best ways to measure QoL or patient satisfaction after treatment. … READ MORE …

Relationship between patient satisfaction and physician-specific outcomes data

A new paper in the Journal of Urology has confirmed that there is a strong correlation between patient satisfaction post-treatment and the ability of physicians to provide counsel to patients about clinical outcomes after treatment based on their own, personal experience and outcomes data. … READ MORE …

Decision aids, PSA-based screening, and male decision-making

According to a newly published study in JAMA Internal Medicine, web-based and print-based decision aids do help men to resolve their own internal conflicts about whether or not to get PSA tests for risk of prostate cancer … READ MORE …