Low serum T and active surveillance: let’s look before we leap

A new report from a group of Italian researchers has suggested that circulating serum testosterone (T) levels in the blood may be a risk for upgrading and upstaging among men initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer who are managed on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

ADT, patient survival, and serum testosterone levels after initiation of treatment

Over the years there have been multiple debates about whether different types of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) really do or don’t extend the survival of men with advanced prostate cancer of differing types and whether the degree to which ADT initially suppresses serum testosterone levels affects that survival. … READ MORE …

Efficacy of continuous ADT and correlation to nadir serum T levels

We had “missed” a poster presented at the recent meeting of the European Urology Association that appears to “put to bed” — in a positive fashion — the question of a relationship between nadir serum testosterone (T) levels in men on continuous androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and the long-term effectiveness of continuous ADT. … READ MORE …

What is the appropriate serum T threshold for medical “castration”?

For many years, the formal threshold level of serum testosterone (T) used to define medical “castration” has been < 50 ng/dl. However, it is widely recognized that this level is probably not low enough to accurately define a medically castrate state. … READ MORE …

Baseline serum androgen levels and responses to abiraterone acetate

Baseline levels of serum androgens were predictive for clinical response to treatment in the Phase III clinical trial of abiraterone acetate in men with chemotherapy-refractory, metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), according to a new article in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. … READ MORE …

A very different way to project risk for clinically significant prostate cancer?

We don’t want to suggest that the recent paper by a Japanese research team in the journal Andrology is necessarily going to revolutionize the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer. A great deal more work would be required to justify the hypothesis that they put forward. On the other hand, their hypothesis is definitely interesting. … READ MORE …

Better identification of potentially good responders to prostate cancer immunotherapy

A paper just published in Clinical Cancer Research has suggested that — at least for one immunotherapeutic agent (“vaccine”) in development for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer — it may be possible to define a subgroup of men who are more likely to respond well to treatment than others. … READ MORE …