Many low-risk patients are not hearing about active surveillance as an appropriate management option

Current guidelines from the American Urological Association (AUA), the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) all clearly state that, for men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, active surveillance is an appropriate form of first-line management. However, … … READ MORE …

Sexual function after prostate cancer treatment in the MSM community

There is a significant knowledge gap concerning sexual function for prostate cancer patients in the men who have sex with men (MSM) community, because all of the existing assessment tools are designed for the heterosexual population. … READ MORE …

Treating the psychosocial and emotional impact of prostate cancer

It doesn’t take too much reading or direct experience to realize that, to date, we haven’t been very good at meeting the needs of patients with prostate cancer — or their spouses/partners — when it comes to the sociocultural and psychological needs associated with this disorder. … READ MORE …

Research survey on male sexuality and prostate cancer

A team of researchers at the University of Calgary in Canada is seeking men with a history of prostate cancer willing to complete a survey related to men’s sexuality. … READ MORE …

Recovery of erectile/sexual function after surgical treatment for prostate cancer

A new review article in the journal Sexual Medicine Reviews has addressed current knowledge on the topic of penile rehabilitation after surgery for localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Sexual rehabilitation after surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer: nine formal recommendations

Two recent articles by Salonia et al. (from the Fourth International Consultation for Sexual Medicine or ICSM 2015) have provided us with a series of nine recommendations to clinicians regarding sexual rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Urinary and sexual healing improved by waiting to start salvage radiation

Salvage radiation adds to the side effects of surgery and may halt the progress made towards healing. Healing takes time. On the other hand, we have learned that adjuvant or early salvage radiation has better oncological outcomes than waiting, the earlier the better (see this link). … READ MORE …