Reports from the EAU “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting in Vienna

The European Association of Urology (EAU) “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting was held in Vienna, Austria, on Friday and Saturday, and Dr. Zachary Klaassen was again busy providing summary reports on presentations for UroToday. … READ MORE …

What’s luminal water imaging, and do we need to care?

Two recent papers by Sabouri et al. have suggested that a new MRI techique known as “luminal water imaging” may be able to improve the ability of MR scans to identify and grade prostate cancer prior to biopsy. … READ MORE …

Changes to the standards for staging of prostate cancer

The most recent, 8th edition, of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual has introduced some relatively minor modifications to the standards for staging of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Just how good is multiparametric, 3-T MRI at finding, staging localized disease?

It is clear that modern magnetic resonance imaging is getting closer to being able to make a major difference to the way that we diagnose (and potentially manage) localized prostate cancer … always assuming we can afford the costs involved (at least here in the USA). … READ MORE …

Standard 1.5 T MRIs in pre-treatment staging of localized prostate cancer

According to a report from a major British teaching hospital, simple, standard, 1.5 T MRI scanning (without use of an endorectal coil) does not improve preoperative staging of localized prostate cancer and should not be used in this scenario. … READ MORE …

PPC as a key element of clinical stage instead of T stage in localized prostate cancer?

In recent years it has become increasingly widely accepted that clinical stage is of dubious value as a prognostic factor in determining prostate cancer risk, particularly as regards the sub-stages of clinical stage T2 (i.e., T2a, T2b, and T2c) in men with localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

When is localized prostate cancer clinically insignificant?

Among prostate cancer specialists, there has been a broad acceptance — for some time — of the idea that a localized prostate cancer “index” tumor with a Gleason score of 6 or less and a volume of ≤ 0.5 cm3 could be considered to be clinically insignificant and therefore did not (necessarily) need to be treated. … READ MORE …