Still “no sufficient evidence” to support any widespread prostate cancer prevention strategy

A new review of the available literature has concluded that, despite the fact that “prostate cancer is an ideal target for prevention,” there is in fact “no suitable evidence to recommend using any specific nutritional supplement or diet to prevent prostate cancer” at the present time. … READ MORE …

But does it make a blind bit of difference?

In a newly published paper in the journal Integrative Cancer Therapies, the authors report high use of vitamins and supplements among undiagnosed men with a brother who has previously been diagnosed with prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Vitamin D supplements may increase prostate cancer risk (at least among Finnish smokers)

Proving the point that (at least in prostate cancer) if you look carefully enough you can always find a study that supports your particular point of view, a new report from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and partner organizations has now demonstrated that, “High blood levels of vitamin D may increase a man’s risk of prostate cancer.” … READ MORE …

What’s hot at the AUA annual meeting (Monday afternoon)?

It is becoming increasingly clear that the prevention, treatment, and management of prostate cancer is at an intellectual as well as a practical, clinical crossroads. … READ MORE …

Testosterone therapy in untreated men with prostate cancer

One of the most controversial issues in the management of prostate cancer is whether testosterone therapy can be given to men who have or are at risk for the recurrence of this type of cancer. Such use of testosterone therapy has been contraindicated for many years, but recent data has started to question this longstanding contraindication … READ MORE …

Vitamins, supplements, and prostate cancer-related risk

Many men use vitamins and other supplements to prevent the onset of prostate cancer or to prevent the progression of prostate cancer after diagnosis. However, a new article in Family Practice suggests that there is no really good clinical evidence for either of these practices in the published literature. … READ MORE …

Why do some nutritional supplements seem to delay prostate cancer progression?

It is widely recognized that some nutritional supplements and other dietary products seem to to have some effect on risk of prostate cancer progression. The problem is that we really don’t know why or how. … READ MORE …

Eli Lilly get FDA approval for “under-arm” testosterone supplement

According to a media release issued just before Thanksgiving, the FDA has approved a new formulation of testosterone supplement (originally developed by an Australian company called Acrux) and licensed to Eli Lilly & Co. for marketing in the USA and the rest of the world. … READ MORE …

The Wednesday news report: March 25, 2009

We have separately addressed data from a 15-year follow-up of a population-based Swedish screening study. Other reports today deal with:

  • The impact of dietary and supplemental zinc on prostate cancer risk
  • Prediction of risk for loss/preservation of erectile function post- prostatectomy
  • Anti-androgen therapy and brachytherapy: options and outcomes … READ MORE ….

Manny “feels like a man again”

Today’s Boston Globe carries a story about Manny Hamelburg, a long-time prostate cancer patient and activist who finally got fed up with “zero libido for seven years.” So Manny started taking testosterone. … READ MORE …