Is anyone with intermediate-risk prostate cancer a “good” candidate for AS?

There is no longer any doubt that men initially diagnosed with low- and very low-risk forms of prostate cancer are, in most cases, either excellent or good candidates for first-line management on active surveillance (AS). … READ MORE …

Is PTEN loss a risk factor for progression of men on active surveillance?

A newly published paper in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases has explored the above question based on data from the Johns Hopkins active surveillance (AS) cohort of men with initially low- or very low-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Anxiety and AS: a patient’s perspective

In his most recent commentary on living on active surveillance, journalist Howard Wolinsky writes about the issue of anxiety which can affect a significant subset of men who are appropriate candidates for active surveillance (AS) or who have difficulty staying on AS — particularly during their first two years of management using this technique. … READ MORE …

Continuity of care for men initially started on active surveillance

You may have noticed that your sitemaster has become a tad obsessed with the ways in which active surveillance is being carried out at different centers and the potential for standardization of this process in the interests of definable groups of patients. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance in management of younger men with prostate cancer

Your sitemaster has long argued that it is perfectly reasonable for many younger men diagnosed with low- and very low-risk forms of prostate cancer to be managed initially on active surveillance (despite reticence on the parts of many physicians and many patients). … READ MORE …

Are we all talking about AS the same way? Not yet!

An interesting new article in The ASCO Post tells us almost as much about the physicians who treat prostate cancer as it does about the options that are available to patients. … READ MORE …

How 48 doctors think about active surveillance

Many patients, prostate cancer advocates, and prostate cancer educators may be interested in a recent article exploring how physicians who manage prostate cancer regularly think about active surveillance (AS) and how to discuss this with their patients. … READ MORE …