Another systemic failure of care and about whether anyone cared at all

Sometimes it’s easier to blame the patient than it is to blame the medical system, and so that’s what people often do. But if one is going to blame the patient, then one really ought to have data to back it up. … READ MORE …

The ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: a brief report

Your sitemaster is gradually “coming back to life” after a rather unpleasant week that included his trip to the GU Cancers Symposium (when he should probably have been in his bed at home). So here is the quick summary from Orlando. … READ MORE …

And now for an update from Howard Wolinsky

Prostate Cancer International is very proud to have been part (through PCPC3) of helping to have a patient participate in the very first session of the recent Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in Orlando, Florida (which was all about active surveillance and its application). … READ MORE …

Systematic counseling and rates of acceptance of active surveillance

According to a newly published paper in European Urology, a simple, hour-long lecture and training session can improve the ability of physicians to counsel patients systematically about active sureveillance and, at one major center, improved patient acceptance of active surveillance by as much as 17 percent. … READ MORE …

The role of 3 T mpMRI in monitoring men on active surveillance

A newly published paper in the American Journal of Roetgenology provides an early data set on the application of 3 T multiparameric MRI scans in monitoring men on active surveillance (as opposed to the use of serial biopsies). … READ MORE …

Why language is important in prostate cancer management

We have emphasized this before, but we want to talk about it again because it recently came up in a general primary care journal: “active surveillance” and “watchful waiting” are often used interchangeably — by patients and their partners and by some doctors too … but they aren’t the same thing at all. … READ MORE …

Low serum T and active surveillance: let’s look before we leap

A new report from a group of Italian researchers has suggested that circulating serum testosterone (T) levels in the blood may be a risk for upgrading and upstaging among men initially diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer who are managed on active surveillance. … READ MORE …