Do men on AS need their own support groups?

Howard Wolinsky is a long-time prostate cancer patient who has been on active surveillance (AS) since his diagnosis in 2010, when one of his doctors described him as a “poster child” for active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Much more monitoring of lower risk prostate cancer in US since 2010

According to a brief research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week, there was a major increase in the application of active surveillance (AS) and watchful waiting (WW) in first-line management of prostate cancer between 2010 and 2015. … READ MORE …

Diet, diagnosis, AS, and the management of lower-risk forms of prostate cancer

Over the years there has been a great deal of speculation (and a very small amount of data) suggesting that men who get diagnosed with relatively low-risk forms of prostate cancer may be able to delay progression of their disease by eating the right diet. … READ MORE …

Howard Wolinsky dodges another MRI and another biopsy

Under the heading “Rats, my PSA went up. Do I need another bleeping biopsy?” Howard Wolinsky provides us with the latest “lowdown” on his 8-year-long prostate cancer journey on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Prognosis of patient progression and outcomes on active surveillance

The prostate cancer research team led by Dr. Peter Pinto at the National Cancer Institute has just published some interesting new information on risk for disease progression in men on active surveillance. … READ MORE …

Picking the right men for initial management on AS

At the recently completed Canadian Uro-oncology Summit in Toronto, Dr. Laurence Klotz gave a very thorough update on active surveillance (AS) and its application in the management of lower-risk forms of localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

First-line treatment for prostate cancer and use of antidepressants

According to a recently reported study in the journal European Urology, men who received first-line surgery or radiation therapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have taken an antidepressant 5 years later than comparable men who didn’t get such treatment. … READ MORE …

Is anyone with intermediate-risk prostate cancer a “good” candidate for AS?

There is no longer any doubt that men initially diagnosed with low- and very low-risk forms of prostate cancer are, in most cases, either excellent or good candidates for first-line management on active surveillance (AS). … READ MORE …

Is PTEN loss a risk factor for progression of men on active surveillance?

A newly published paper in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases has explored the above question based on data from the Johns Hopkins active surveillance (AS) cohort of men with initially low- or very low-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Anxiety and AS: a patient’s perspective

In his most recent commentary on living on active surveillance, journalist Howard Wolinsky writes about the issue of anxiety which can affect a significant subset of men who are appropriate candidates for active surveillance (AS) or who have difficulty staying on AS — particularly during their first two years of management using this technique. … READ MORE …

Continuity of care for men initially started on active surveillance

You may have noticed that your sitemaster has become a tad obsessed with the ways in which active surveillance is being carried out at different centers and the potential for standardization of this process in the interests of definable groups of patients. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance in management of younger men with prostate cancer

Your sitemaster has long argued that it is perfectly reasonable for many younger men diagnosed with low- and very low-risk forms of prostate cancer to be managed initially on active surveillance (despite reticence on the parts of many physicians and many patients). … READ MORE …

Are we all talking about AS the same way? Not yet!

An interesting new article in The ASCO Post tells us almost as much about the physicians who treat prostate cancer as it does about the options that are available to patients. … READ MORE …

How 48 doctors think about active surveillance

Many patients, prostate cancer advocates, and prostate cancer educators may be interested in a recent article exploring how physicians who manage prostate cancer regularly think about active surveillance (AS) and how to discuss this with their patients. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance in Oz: a situation report

An interesting article published a couple of week’s ago in the Medical Journal of Australia reports on “real world issues” related to the implementation of active surveillance (AS) in Oz. … READ MORE …