Why exactly do married/partnered prostate cancer patients live longer than single ones?

Historic data have long suggested that men with prostate cancer who are in a stable, married (or a long-term “partnered”) relationship have better long-term survival than single males. … READ MORE …

Low PSA + Gleason 8 to 10 disease predictive of higher risk, worse survival

It has been hypothesized for some time that men diagnosed with a low PSA level (i.e., < 4.0 ng/ml) but a high Gleason score (of 8, 9, or 10) are at elevated risk for more advanced disease and a shorter survival time than some others. … READ MORE …

Guessing the future price of the next major breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment

In an article published on Monday September 28, in Pharmaceutical Executive (a well-known biopharmaceutical industry trade journal) a senior health care public relations executive recently laid out a detailed rationale for why the industry needs to do a better job … READ MORE …

Long-term survival of men initially diagnosed with advanced (Stage IV) prostate cancer

An article in the July issue of the journal Radiation Oncology, along with a commentary on the UroToday web site, provides us with some interesting insights about the long-term survival of patients initially diagnosed with more advanced forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Does radical prostatectomy really extend life … at least in Denmark?

A newly published paper in the Scandinavian Journal of Urology comes to the potentially controversial conclusion that “the gain in life expectancy” after surgical treatment by radical prostatectomy “is minimal” for Danish men with prostate cancer compared to the life expectancy of Danish men in general. … READ MORE …

Not all men with Gleason 8-10 disease are going to do badly after treatment

There is a perception among a lot of patients — especially when they get diagnosed — that having a high Gleason score of 8, 9, or 10 is essentially a “death sentence”, regardless of how they get treated. … READ MORE …

Survival of men with mCRPC who receive no additional life-prolonging treatment

A new article in the Scandinavian Journal of Urology provides us with some insight — from relatively recent data — into the survival times of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after prior treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) but who either decline or do not receive any further form of life-prolonging therapy. … READ MORE …