Prostate cancer prevention and the VITAL study data

Two sets of data from the 5-year-long VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) were published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. … READ MORE …

Are low serum levels of vitamin D a risk factor for aggressive forms of prostate cancer?

It has long between understood that there is an association between a man’s serum levels of vitamin D and his risk for prostate cancer in general and clinically significant prostate cancer in particular. … READ MORE …

Vitamin D as a treatment for low-risk prostate cancer? Not based on these data!

A presentation at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver earlier this week suggested the possibility that men who took 4,000 IU of vitamin D every day for 60 days prior to a radical prostatectomy did better than similar men taking a placebo. … READ MORE …

GDF-15, vitamin D, and risk for prostate cancer

A new study by Lambert et al. in the journal Prostate proposes that some forms of chronic prostatic inflammation, driven by low levels of a molecule known as growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), may lead to prostate cancer development. … READ MORE …

Denosumab therapy and risk for severe hypocalcemia

Denosumab — marketed as Xgeva and as Prolia — is associated with a rare but well-known risk for severe hypocalcemia (very low calcium in the blood stream). Denosumab, when give as Xgeva,  is specifically indicated for the prevention of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from prostate and other forms of cancer. … READ MORE …

Do vitamin D and/or calcium prevent bone loss for men on ADT?

A newly published report has questioned the value of recommended doses of calcium and vitamin D supplements for men at risk for lower bone mineral density because of their use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Vitamin D supplements may increase prostate cancer risk (at least among Finnish smokers)

Proving the point that (at least in prostate cancer) if you look carefully enough you can always find a study that supports your particular point of view, a new report from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and partner organizations has now demonstrated that, “High blood levels of vitamin D may increase a man’s risk of prostate cancer.” … READ MORE …