Time to death among men with nmCRPC by NCCN risk group

One of the abstracts to be presented at ASCO this year gives us some insight into risk for and time to death among men with non-metastatic but castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC). … READ MORE …

Aspirin use and risk for lethal prostate cancer

New data derived from the Physicans’ Health Study have suggested that there is an association between regular aspirin use and avoidance of risk for lethal forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Estimating overall survival for prostate cancer patients

It’s a question every prostate cancer patient wants an answer to: “OK doc. I get it. But how long am I gonna live with this?”

It’s also a question that doctors have a very great deal of difficulty answering, for a whole bunch of reasons. So … READ MORE …

The human capacity for denial … or at the very least avoidance

Your sitemaster is intimately familiar with the human capacity for denial and avoidance. As someone who has spent much of his life writing for a living, he knows all too well his capacity for avoiding some topics until he absolutely has to deal with them! … READ MORE …

Clinical and therapeutic histories of men who actually die of mCRPC

Despite all the prostate cancer research over the past 30 or so years, we still have limited information about the clinical and therapeutic history of prostate cancer in men who have progressive disease and go on to die of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

When to start planning for end-of-life care and death from prostate cancer

Alas, as most of our readers are all too well aware, some 30,000 or more men in America will die from prostate cancer this year and next year and on into the future, unless and until we find some radically new types of treatment. However, … READ MORE …

After 10 years, risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality lower for high-risk patients

A paper presented at the annual meeting of the European Association of Urology (EAU) suggests that high-risk prostate cancer patients < 60 years of age at the time of radical prostatectomy are more likely to die from their cancer than from other causes during the first 10 years after their surgery. But after that, other causes of death become more likely. … READ MORE …