A high-grade ego with high-grade prostate cancer

For those who have either forgotten or never knew who Craig Venter is or was, here’s an update: he recently had surgical treatment for “high-grade” prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Aggressive, neoadjuvant androgen ablation prior to surgery in higher risk prostate cancer patients

The development of drugs like abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide has stimulated new research into the use of such agents early on, in combination with first-line therapy, to see if it can affect the outcomes for men with high-risk and unfavorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Genetics, PSA, and steps toward a better prostate cancer risk management strategy

A new analysis of a large data set compiled by Kaiser Permanente suggests that combining PSA data with genetic risk data may offer a much more effective way to assess risk for clinically significant prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Risk, prostate cancer, and being 70 to 80 years of age

So a relatively new article in Reviews in Urology caught your Sitemaster’s eye this morning — and worried him because it seemed to be communicating a conclusion of questionable accuracy, which we will explore below. And if we have misinterpreted the data provide in the paper, we are more than willing to be corrected. … READ MORE …

USPSTF selects AUA-nominated urologist to review evidence report on prostate cancer screening

As many readers will be aware, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is in process of developing a new “evidence report” which will form the basis of any update to current USPSTF recommendations about prostate cancer screening. … READ MORE …

Systematic counseling and rates of acceptance of active surveillance

According to a newly published paper in European Urology, a simple, hour-long lecture and training session can improve the ability of physicians to counsel patients systematically about active sureveillance and, at one major center, improved patient acceptance of active surveillance by as much as 17 percent. … READ MORE …

Less treatment regret with SBRT, and when patients are fully informed

There is growing recognition that the patient’s satisfaction or regret with his treatment decision is more than just a matter of whether he is happy with the oncological outcome. Satisfaction/regret is the product of many variables, including how well he understood his options, his interactions with his doctors, the side effects he suffered and when he suffered them, his expectations about the side effects of treatment, and cultural factors. … READ MORE …