Brief, intense radiation and hormone therapy for very high-risk prostate cancer

As we’ve seen, brachy boost therapy seems to have the best oncological results for men with very high-risk prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

FDA approves Pylarify for diagnosis of advanced/recurrent forms of prostate cancer

In ,a recent media release, Lantheus Holdings announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had approved the imaging agent known as piflufolastat F 18 Injection (also known as Pylarify® or more commonly just “PyL”) as a PSMA-based PET imaging agent for identification of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Are we closer to automated pathological assessment of prostate cancer biopsy slides?

According to a recent article in Modern Pathology, a team of researchers at Yale University and at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) have been able to show that an artificial intelligence (AI) system designed and validated at MSKCC could be used to diagnose prostate cancer as either “suspicious” or “not suspicious” based on data from nearly 2,000 slides of prostate tissue acquired at Yale Medicine. … READ MORE …

Active surveillance and related research: a new research initiative

As some of our readers will already be aware, Prostate Cancer International has been working in concert with Dr. M. Mihaj Siddiqui at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the PATIENTS program at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy to put together a grant request for funding for a program to identify evidence gaps to guide future research on the use of active surveillance to monitor low-risk prostate cancers. … READ MORE …

Major new survey on active surveillance and prostate cancer

In February, a group of researchers initiated a major new survey of patient knowledge about active surveillance as an initial management option for men with lower risk forms of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Another new urine test for risk of prostate cancer

As we have mentioned previously, data on the use of a variety of methods of urine testing in assessment of risk for clinically significant prostate cancer (and therefore the need for a follow-up biopsy) continues to evolve. … READ MORE …

AS and management of Grade Group 2 prostate cancer

The abstract of a presentation to be given by Egan et al. — from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at Bethesda, MD — at the upcoming, virtual Genitourinary Cancers Symposium has indicated that active surveillance (AS) seems to be a very reasonable option for first-line management for compliant patients initially diagnosed with Grade Group 2 prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Risk for and detection of clinically significant prostate cancer in previously unbiopsied patients

The “best” way to identify clinically significant, localized prostate cancer continues to evolve. But there is still no consensus about what that “best” way might be to do this, let alone any consensus about the detection of “clinically insignificant”, localized prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Urine testing for risk of prostate cancer: a current and future perspective

It is becoming very clear that over the next 5 to 10 years we will develop a whole new spectrum of urine-based tests for the assessment of risk for prostate cancer and whether a specific patient will actually need a biopsy and/or other tests to confirm diagnosis. … READ MORE…

Mediterranean diet, active surveillance, and low-risk prostate cancer: the details

As we advised readers yesterday, a newly published study by Gregg et al. from the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has given some clear indications that men diagnosed with lower-risk forms of prostate cancer who are initially managed on active surveillance (AS) can benefit — in terms of time to disease progression — from what is known as the Mediterranean-type diet. … READ MORE …

Mediterranean diet, active surveillance, and low-risk prostate cancer

The abstract of a newly published study on the use of the Mediterranean diet (MD) by men on active surveillance (AS) for management of low-risk, localized prostate cancer states that … READ MORE …

FDA approves first gallium-68 PSMA PET scan imaging agent in US, BUT …

Yesterday the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave its approval for the first gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging agent (Ga-67 PSMA-11), for the use in association with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning for the evaluation of men with suspected prostate cancer — and most particularly for those men  with high-risk characteristics suggesting the possibility of metastasis, including men with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease. However, here’s the “but”… READ MORE …

“Doctor, where did my cancer go?”

Some 18 months ago we had written about the possible occurrence of spontaneous remissions in men on active surveillance (AS) for low-risk forms of prostate cancer. We were therefore very interested in a recent article closely related to this topic. … READ MORE..

AS for lower-risk forms of prostate cancer needs celebrity endorsement

The following article was written by two of the founders of Active Surveillance Patients International (ASPI) under the title “Al Roker’s forecast: rising PSA and a radical prostatectomy” and distributed largely by e-mail. It is re-posted here with the permission of the authors. … READ MORE …

The PSA test in “screening” for prostate cancer: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

So our good friend Howard Wolinsky has just written up his assessment on the evolution of the use of the PSA test in “screening” for prostate cancer in an article on the MedPage Today web site. … READ MORE …