The pros and cons of “screening” for prostate cancer

A newly published article by Shoag et al. in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has suggested that the risks associated with “screening” for prostate cancer using the PSA test may not be as high as previously suggested. … READ MORE …

Jane Brody on prostate cancer in the NYT

Jane Brody is an experienced journalist who writes regularly about issues related to health care in The New York Times. Your sitemaster regularly reads her columns because she does her homework with care and provides sound information for her readers. … READ MORE …

Germline BRCA2 mutations and management of mCRPC

A newly published paper in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has confirmed — based on a prospective study (as opposed to retrospective data) — that there is a strong risk association between a germline mutation of the BRCA2 gene and risk for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). … READ MORE …

Maybe coming soon to a medical center near you?

Our regular readers will remember that we have commented on and off on the development of different types of system that (maybe) can be used to test for risk of cancer based on smell … an ability that has been clearly demonstrated among certain trained dogs and one of two electronic systems. … READ MORE …

A poorly informed public and risk for cancer

A recent report from the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), here in the US, found — unsurprisingly to your sitemaster, at least — that the average American remains very poorly informed about risk for prostate cancer and associated issues. … READ MORE …

But annual, mass, population-based PSA screening really works (or does it?)

A new and potentially controversial article in Urology (the “Gold Journal”) has just suggested that regular, mass, population-based screening of men for risk of prostate cancer every 12 to 18 months remains a good idea. … READ MORE …

It’s Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, again …

… and during Prostate Cancer Awareness Month men and their families are regularly subjected to messaging about the importance of getting “screened” for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

“Is prostate cancer screening right for you?”

The following infographic was also issued today by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and offers guidance as to the appropriateness of prostate cancer screening for an average, 55- to 69-year-old American male with no specific, known risk factors for prostate cancer: … READ MORE …

USPSTF releases new guidance about prostate cancer screening

Earlier today, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued the final version of its revised guidance on screening for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

A problem with cancer screening (at least in the USA)

According to a recent report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, only 5.6 percent of a sample of 3,677 Americans of 18 years of age or older could correctly evaluate four simple statements about cancer screening. … READ MORE …

The 400,000+ CAP screening trial reports initial results

A while ago now we had first mentioned the “Cluster randomized trial of PSA testing for prostate cancer” or CAP trial — the single largest randomized trial of PSA screening for risk of prostate cancer to be implemented. … READ MORE …

Understanding genetics, genomics, and their utility in prostate cancer

Our friends at UroToday have just published a perfectly lovely lecture on this topic given by Prof. Lenny Gomella at the recent annual meeting of the Large Urology Group Practice Association (LUGPA). … READ MORE …

Reports from the EAU “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting in Vienna

The European Association of Urology (EAU) “Update on Prostate Cancer” meeting was held in Vienna, Austria, on Friday and Saturday, and Dr. Zachary Klaassen was again busy providing summary reports on presentations for UroToday. … READ MORE …

The prostate cancer “screening” controversy … an update

Yesterday we mentioned a new paper on PSA screening by Tsodikov et al. in the Annals of Internal Medicine. We have now had the chance to read the full text of that paper, as well as the associated editorial by Vickers in the same issue of the journal. … READ MORE …

And now PSA “screening” does save lives again … maybe

A new article just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine has suggested that PSA testing really does save lives. But the new article isn’t based on any really new data. … READ MORE …