Starting the new year with two of the usual controversies

Strictly speaking, JAMA Oncology actually ended the old year (in its issue on December 29, 2016), rather than beginning the new one, with two articles, a letter to the editor, and an editorial that deal with two of the more controversial issues that affect the way we think about the management of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

And now … data from the PCLO trial at 15 years …

A new update on the prostate cancer outcomes of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial has given us a rather different interpretation of the meaning of the data from this trial — although whether that “meaning” actually has “meaning” is probably up for debate. … READ MORE …

Responsibilities unasked for and the role of the USPSTF

A commentary in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine provides some valuable, historical insight into how it was that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) ended up with responsibilities that many of its members never wanted. … READ MORE …

Suggestions of bias in decisions about who got biopsies in the SELECT trial

A re-analysis of data from men participating in the placebo arms of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) and the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) has suggested a problem with bias in decisions about who gets biopsies during certain types of clinical trial. … READ MORE …

A potential new model for prostate cancer screening?

A highly influential group of senior urologists have come together to propose a new model as a methodology for screening men for risk of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Of politics, prostate cancer, screening, and editorial opinions

We don’t often refer to articles in what are primarily political publications like The Hill, but an OpEd in that journal this week did catch our attention, and not in a particularly good way either. … READ MORE …

PSA testing in the “real world” … from 2010 to 2015

A newly published article in the journal Cancer suggests that, in fact, the USPSTF guidance on use of the PSA test for risk of prostate cancer has had little impact in the “real world” between 2010 and 2015 (at least at one large tertiary care institution in Texas). … READ MORE …