So drinking cranberry juice can lower your PSA level, but what does that mean?

As we have noted numerous times before, there are all sorts of things that can be done to lower one’s PSA level, but knowing whether these effects are clinically meaningful is a very different issue. … READ MORE …

What you can’t prove can still be presented as if it were the truth

Another new article (this time in the journal JAMA Surgery) has tried to draw links between the USPSTF guidance on prostate cancer screening and a decrease in the numbers of men being referred to urologists for prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomies. … READ MORE …

Responsibilities unasked for and the role of the USPSTF

A commentary in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine provides some valuable, historical insight into how it was that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) ended up with responsibilities that many of its members never wanted. … READ MORE …

tPSA, cPSA, %fPSA and risk for diagnosis with and death from prostate cancer

Data from a series of > 1,200 Danish patients, all referred by their primary primary care physicians to a single, specialized urology practice, seems to confirm what has long been suspected about the relative values of total and complex PSA levels in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Of politics, prostate cancer, screening, and editorial opinions

We don’t often refer to articles in what are primarily political publications like The Hill, but an OpEd in that journal this week did catch our attention, and not in a particularly good way either. … READ MORE …

Non-rising PSA but radiographic progression in men on treatment with enzalutamide

A recent presentation at the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, has suggested that some men on treatment with enzalutamide (Xtandi) may have radiographic progression of their cancer even though there is no increase in their PSA levels. … READ MORE …

PSA testing in the “real world” … from 2010 to 2015

A newly published article in the journal Cancer suggests that, in fact, the USPSTF guidance on use of the PSA test for risk of prostate cancer has had little impact in the “real world” between 2010 and 2015 (at least at one large tertiary care institution in Texas). … READ MORE …