The continuing importance of the digital rectal exam

Many men dislike digital rectal examinations (DREs) — for all sorts of reasons. However, a new study has again pointed out the value of the DRE in helping to establish clinical risk and the potential aggressiveness of a specific prostate cancer diagnosis in each individual patient. … READ MORE …

“To DRE or not to DRE, that is the question”

With apologies to the Bard of Avon and his character Hamlet, the above-misquoted Prince of Denmark, we bring to your attention the most recent article by our good friend Howard Wolinsky on issues related to prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

The role of the digital rectal examination in prostate cancer today

The question of whether digital rectal examinations (DREs) retain value in testing men for risk for prostate cancer (individual “screening”) has been controversial for many years now. Some men flatly refuse to have DREs for socio-cultural reasons. Others will put up with them, but they don’t like the idea. This is utterly unsurprising. … READ MORE …

Declining use of the DRE at a large VA medical center: is this a national trend?

Once upon a time (not so very long ago) the digital rectal examination or DRE was the only non-invasive test that a physician could use to assess whether a patient was at risk for localized prostate cancer and/or other prostate problems. Alas, the use of this test appears to be falling out of favor, which is probably not a good thing. … READ MORE …

DRE is still a key diagnostic tool in assessing risk for prostate cancer

A new study just published in the Canadian Journal of Urology has reminded us of the importance of the digital rectal emamination (DRE) in the initial diagnosis of prostate cancer. … READ MORE …

Should the DRE really be “optional” today?

Until very recently, all available guidelines for the early assessment of risk for prostate cancer clearly recommended the use of a physical examination (a digital rectal exam or DRE) in addition to a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. … READ MORE …

The Norrkoping prostate cancer screening trial — with 20-year follow-up

A new report just published as an open access, full-text article at BMJ.com is going to further confuse the issue of whether mass, population-based screening for prostate cancer is or isn’t a good idea. … READ MORE …