A 17 percent potency rate post-surgery in one Swedish study

According to another media release issued on Sunday by the European Association of Urology, only 17 percent of a large cohort of Swedish men with prostate cancer who were potent prior to surgery were still potent 18 months post-surgery (whether they had nerve-sparing or non-nerve-sparing surgery). … READ MORE …

More on age and urinary continence post-radical prostatectomy

We commented on Friday last week on a paper by Wallerstedt et al. addressing factors affecting risk for urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. One reader had asked us whether we could provide more details about the age breakdown and the rates of urinary incontinence in the patients studied by the Swedish research team. … READ MORE …

Continence and sexual function after RALP as opposed to LRP

A paper just published in European Urology claims that prostate cancer patients treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) recover continence and sexual function faster than those treated with non-robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (LRP). … READ MORE …

RALP not associated with better continence, sexual function after prostate cancer surgery

The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink has long been pointing out the lack of any evidence that men who are treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) will have better outcomes with respect to continence and sexual function than men who elect to have the older, “open” form of radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

The “best” way to measure post-treatment levels of urinary continence

A new paper published by researchers from Sweden’s prestigious Karolinska Institute and related institutions makes it increasingly clear that — to date — we haven’t been able to work out (let alone consistently use) a really good way to measure real urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. … READ MORE …

The fine art of the circular argument applied to management of prostate cancer

It will likely be evident to most well-informed prostate cancer patients, support group leaders, and advocates that a man with low-risk, early stage prostate cancer (“favorable histology”) is potentially a good candidate for prostate cancer surgery. … READ MORE …

How good are good “trifecta” data after surgery?

One of the constant questions that arises in the management of prostate cancer is just how many patients actually achieve the full “trifecta” (freedom from biochemical progression, pad-free continence, and good erectile function) after surgical treatment for localized disease. … READ MORE …